July 25, 2014
So I saw Edge of Tomorrow: A 5-Point Review

1. Tom Cruise wasn’t insufferable. Emily Blunt was almost a real character. But I think heterosexual tension had a bigger part than either of them.

2. Interesting how in the perhaps-not-so-distant future, even science fiction hasn’t dealt with drone warfare as a reality and the only weapons advances are human prostheses.

3. Why are tentacles the sign of evil aliens?

4.The dying-reset button trope is a not-at-all subtle metaphor for video games. Taken together with point 2, I seriously think this movie might be about the lag in between how we imagine war might currently be, and how it really will be/is. This film is a hiccup.

5. Is it just me, or has there been an influx in movies with a Watchmen-style plot where the only way to ensure the world getting along with/not killing each other is the fear of a non-human threat?

Conclusion: Bad-ass yoga, tentacly aliens, and time-travel, oh my! Politics too, I guess.

July 25, 2014
This will never get old to me.

This will never get old to me.

(Source: zgmfd, via hfml)

July 25, 2014
I always forget how to talk to people who think that heterosexuality is the status quo and how that’s both self-evident and politically neutral.

July 23, 2014

Today, before a French-Israeli client told me that the insane slaughter in Gaza is just Israel defending itself, our security guard asked me, “is it true that during September 11th, 50,000 Jews didn’t come to work that day because they knew about it?” After I said “No, there were definitely Jews who died in the World Trade Center,” he replied “Yeah, I told my wife that. I told her I would check with the American guy I work with. I knew she was wrong. You know, she calls Jews ‘the landlords of the world,’ like y’know, how they control everything. 

July 22, 2014
Et si ta fille est lesbienne ? (And what if your daughter is a lesbian?)

Et si ta fille est lesbienne ? (And what if your daughter is a lesbian?)

July 22, 2014

“True rebels after all, are as rare as true lovers, and in both cases, to mistake a fever for passion can destroy one’s life.”
— James Baldwin

True rebels after all, are as rare as true lovers, and in both cases, to mistake a fever for passion can destroy one’s life.
James Baldwin

(Source: blunthought, via close-to-the-knives)

July 22, 2014

akajonjohn:

CLIC FOR MORE

Sebastiane, Chicago Feb 2014, Mana Contemporary/ defibril8or/Hook Torture

With Ron Athey and Sage Charles

July 16, 2014
postervirus:

LOOK AFTER EACH OTHER
Scott Treleaven
The rough edged look of the poster is an intentional strategy: I always find that the trace of an actual hand-drawn element in posters or signage makes a message far more immediate and intimate. I wanted to come up with something simple, striking, and evocative of the kind of imagery that’s always caught my attention (HomoCult, Gran Fury, Queer Action Figures, etc). The pos/neg imagery was an obvious choice for me as all of my current work deals with ideas of interconnectivity, continuity, and perception. As constructs, the symbols are only useful as visual shorthand and they deliberately fall apart, or vanish, at the edge of the page. As for the text - the message is simple. It’s a broad-based but heartfelt slogan meant to imply a number of issues around health, awareness, community, charity, and solidarity. Queers, especially younger ones, seem to be fatigued when it comes to AIDS awareness, and I think this is largely due to the awful, exclusionary push towards “normalizing” queer culture. The message, to look after each other, is always worth reiterating. We’ve always watched out for one another when no one else would. And this message is becoming more important than ever.

The message, to look after each other, is always worth reiterating.
The message, to look after each other, is always worth reiterating.
The message, to look after each other, is always worth reiterating.
The message, to look after each other, is always worth reiterating.
The message, to look after each other, is always worth reiterating.
The message, to look after each other, is always worth reiterating.

postervirus:

LOOK AFTER EACH OTHER

Scott Treleaven

The rough edged look of the poster is an intentional strategy: I always find that the trace of an actual hand-drawn element in posters or signage makes a message far more immediate and intimate. I wanted to come up with something simple, striking, and evocative of the kind of imagery that’s always caught my attention (HomoCult, Gran Fury, Queer Action Figures, etc). The pos/neg imagery was an obvious choice for me as all of my current work deals with ideas of interconnectivity, continuity, and perception. As constructs, the symbols are only useful as visual shorthand and they deliberately fall apart, or vanish, at the edge of the page. As for the text - the message is simple. It’s a broad-based but heartfelt slogan meant to imply a number of issues around health, awareness, community, charity, and solidarity. Queers, especially younger ones, seem to be fatigued when it comes to AIDS awareness, and I think this is largely due to the awful, exclusionary push towards “normalizing” queer culture. The message, to look after each other, is always worth reiterating. We’ve always watched out for one another when no one else would. And this message is becoming more important than ever.

The message, to look after each other, is always worth reiterating.

The message, to look after each other, is always worth reiterating.

The message, to look after each other, is always worth reiterating.

The message, to look after each other, is always worth reiterating.

The message, to look after each other, is always worth reiterating.

The message, to look after each other, is always worth reiterating.

July 15, 2014
TOP 10 BOOKS THAT HAVE STAYED WITH ME

temporarilyeuropean:

aldrinvaldez:

Rules: In a text post, list 10 books that have stayed with you in some way. Don’t take but a few minutes, and don’t think too hard—they don’t have to be the “right” or “great” works, just the ones that have touched you.

Beloved by Toni Morrison

The Child by Sarah Schulman

Ties That Bind:…

Close to the Knives, David Wojnarowicz

AIDS and its Metaphors, Susan Sontag

The Farewell Symphony, Edmund White

Mrs. Dalloway, Virginia Woolf

The Waves, Virginia Woolf

Another Country, James Baldwin

Giovanni’s Room, James Baldwin

The Queer Art of Failure, J. Jack Halberstam (written under Judith)

Rubyfruit Jungle, Rita Mae Brown

Une melancholie arabe, Abdellah Taïa

I forgot the Epistemology of the Closet by Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick and I feel terrible because it is the most important book I have ever read in regards to sexuality. Sorry Eve.

July 15, 2014
Important.

Important.

(Source: nekomcevil, via chescaleigh)

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